Assignment 1 – Development of a Simple Menu Driven Text Adventure
Assignment 1 – Development of a Simple Menu Driven Text Adventure

ITECH 1000/ITECH 5000 Programming 1 Assignment 1 2015 Sem1
Assignment 1 – Development of a Simple Menu Driven Text Adventure
Due Date: 4pm, Thursday Week 7 (see Course Description for further details)
Please see the Course Description for further information related to submission date, extensions for
assignments and Special Consideration. You may be required to demonstrate your working code to your tutor
in your lab class.
Project Overview
For this assignment you will be provided with incomplete sample starter code that you can modify and build
upon. Your task will be to carry out the design, analysis, coding and testing to add several additional features
to this sample code. You are expected to fully comment the provided code as well as your own code.
This project will implement a simple menu-driven text adventure. Text adventure games were very popular in
the early days of computer gaming, as they could run even on low-end computer systems which could not
support advanced graphics. The player controlled a character within an environment such as a fantasy castle
or a spaceship. The environment was made up of a series of interconnected locations, which were described
to the player by written descriptions. By entering short text commands such as “go north” or “get key” the
player could explore these locations, pick up and use objects within the environment, fight enemies and so on.
Generally the player had to solve a series of puzzles to enable them to achieve a goal in the game such as
reaching a goal location where treasure was stored. Many of the classic text adventures are now freely
available online, so if you are interested you may want to try some of them:
• Colossal Cave (the first text adventure): http://rickadams.org/adventure/
• The Hobbit (made in Melbourne!): https://archive.org/details/msdos_Hobbit_The_1983
• The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/1g84m0sXpnNCv84GpN2PLZG/the-hitchhikers-guide-tothe-galaxy-game-30th-anniversary-edition
Developing a complete text adventure is too challenging at this stage of the course, so we will make a number
of simplifications:
• To avoid having to process commands made up of one or more words, all user input will be through a
numeric menu.
• Interaction with objects in the game will be very limited.
The provided partial solution source code implements some fundamental aspects of the text adventure:
• The use of arrays (both 1D and 2D) to store information about the map which defines the game world,
the descriptions of locations, and the description and location of game objects
• A simple numeric menu which the player uses to enter commands
• The ability for the player to move between locations in the game world by moving in the four cardinal
compass directions (north, east, south and west)
CRICOS Provider No. 00103D ITECH1000/5000 Programming 1 Assignment 1 Specification Page 1 of 6
Project Specification
Your task will be to first answer some questions testing your comprehension of the partial solution, and then to
extend this partial solution to provide additional features:
1. Answer the questions listed below under Part A – save your answers into a Word document for
submission along with remainder of your assignment.
2. Design your own unique game world, which must exhibit the following characteristics:
a. It should consist of between 10 and 20 interconnected locations (please don’t exceed this limit
as it will slow down the marking process)
b. All eight possible directions of movement (N, S, E, W, NE, SE, SW, NW) must be used at least
once in the game map.
c. The world should contain 10 objects. At least one location must contain no objects, and at least
one location must contain multiple objects.
d. Every location and object must have its own unique description.
e. There must be a specified ‘goal’ location which the player is aiming to reach – this will be used
later within Stage 6 of the project.
Your design should be clearly documented in the form of a world map and table of descriptions similar
to the example provided on moodle.
3. Extend the menu and related code so that the player can also move in the ordinal directions (northeast,
south-east, south-west, north-west)
4. Modify the program code and data so as to implement the game world designed in Stage 2.
5. Add a ‘quit’ option to the menu, and modify the loop in the main() method so that it exits if the user
enters this command.
6. Further modify the loop so that it exits and displays a suitable congratulatory message if the player
reaches a specific ‘goal’ location within the game-world.
7. Modify the room description method so that the player automatically picks up any objects in their
current location. If the room description is redisplayed, those objects should no longer be listed as
being in that location (hint: use a special value such as -1 to indicate that an object is in the player’s
possession).
8. Add an additional ‘inventory’ command to the menu and implement a method which is called when this
command is entered, which will list all of the objects currently in the player’s possession.
9. Now that no further commands will be added to the menu, modify the menu code to ensure that a valid
selection has been made by the player. If not, display an error message and prompt them to enter a
new value. Repeat this until valid input is obtained.
10. This is the most advanced aspect of the project – do not attempt this unless you have all the
other requirements working. Modify the program code so that the goal location cannot be entered
unless the player is carrying a particular object (e.g. a key). If the player tries to enter the room without
this object then an appropriate message should be displayed. For full marks for this section, your
solution should be easily applicable to other game worlds (for example worlds with multiple locked
doors).
The Assessment section of the moodle site contains a video demonstrating a fully working version of the
program which should help to clarify these requirements.
CRICOS Provider No. 00103D ITECH 1000/5000 Programming 1 Assignment 1 Specification Page 2 of 6
Resources Provided
The following files/links are available on Moodle:
• An electronic copy of this assignment specification sheet
• The General Guide for the Presentation of Academic Work
• A sample incomplete program to get you started (TextAdventure.java)
• A video of a complete version of the project
• A sample design document for the game world used in the video.
NOTE: If you use any resources apart from the course material to complete your assignment you MUST
provide an in-text citation within your documentation and/or code, as well as providing a list of references in
APA formatting. This includes the use of any websites, online forums, books or text books. If you are unsure
of how to do this please ask for help.
Part A – Code Comprehension
Sample code has been provided in Moodle. Use the sample code provided to answer the following questions.
Save your answers in a Word or pdf file, and include that file in your assignment submission:
1. Explain why NO_EXIT has been declared and used in defining the contents of the map array, rather
than just directly using the value 99999 in the map array definition.
2. What is the value stored in map[2][1]? What is the interpretation of this value in terms of the structure
of the game world? .
3. Explain what change would need to be made to the code in order for the potato object to be in the logcabin
rather than the clearing.
4. Describe the change (if any) in the program behaviour if the describeLocation() method was changed
to the following code:
private void describeLocation() https://yourassignmenthelpers.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=1698520&action=edit

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